Clinton adviser says there’s ‘good chance’ of 2024 Hillary

Clinton adviser says there’s ‘good chance’ of 2024 Hillary

Dick Morris, a onetime top adviser to former President Bill Clinton, says there’s a “good chance” of a 2024 rematch between Hillary Clinton and ex-President Donald Trump.

Morris said Sunday that if Democrats lose control of Congress in the 2022 midterm elections, President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris will be toast — paving the way for a second Hillary bid, with husband Bill playing an architect to her strategy.

“There’s a good chance of it,” said Morris, referring to a Hillary-Trump rematch, to John Catsimatidis on the radio host’s WABC show.

“Hillary has set up a brilliant strategy that nobody else is able to do,” Morris added. “Knowing the people around her, I believe there is only one person capable of that level of thinking — and that’s her husband, Bill.

“The second the election is over … every Democrat is going to take a shot at Biden and Harris. They will be DOA,” Morris said.

Meanwhile, at a time when no Democrats are publicly criticizing Biden, Clinton has been warning her party about aligning itself with the policies of progressive Democrats.

​”She has set up a zero-sum game where the worse [Biden] does, the better she does, because she’s positioned herself as the Democratic alternative to Biden. Not just to Biden, but to the extreme left in the Democratic Party,” Morris said.

Hillary Clinton stands with an American flag behind her.
Morris said that Clinton has positioned herself as the Democratic alternative to Biden.
AFP via Getty Images

“The person who staked out the turf first and owns the turf in the Democratic Party is going to be Hillary. It’s a brilliant, brilliant strategy​,” Morris said.​

In an interview with MSNBC, Hillary, the former secretary of state in the Obama administration, cautioned Democrats to take time for “some careful thinking” about winning elections, “not just in deep-blue districts where a Democrat and a liberal Democrat, or so-called progressive Democrat, is going to win.”

Morris said, “She was right about that.

“She staked out a ground, not on ideological issues, but on pragmatism.”

Donald Trump gives a thumbs up with flags behind him.
Trump has yet to announce plans regarding the 2024 election.
Getty Images

Clinton in the MSNBC interview also took a shot at the Biden administration’s struggle to pass legislation in a Democratic-controlled Congress.

While she said she was “all about vigorous debate … at the end of the day, it means nothing if we don’t have a Congress that will get things done and we don’t have a White House that we can count on to be sane and sober and stable and productive.”

An op-ed last week in the Wall Street Journal made the case for a 2024 Clinton run, saying the poor poll numbers for Biden and Harris, as well as Harris’ own unpopularity, could open the door for the former first lady.

“She is already in an advantageous position to become the 2024 Democratic nominee,” wrote Democratic political consultant Doug Schoen and former Manhattan Borough President Andrew Stein about the 74-year-old Clinton.

“She is an experienced national figure who is younger than Mr. Biden and can offer a different approach from the disorganized and unpopular one the party is currently taking.”

And last week, Politico reported that Hillary and her husband see an opening to return to prominence in the Democratic Party in the squabbling between moderates and progressives over Biden’s legislative agenda that has doomed the Build Back Better social-spending plan and election reforms.

“It’s a perpetual itch that will never go away,” one insider told the site of the Clintons’ desire to have Hillary return to political office. “They know how to slowly re-enter. The Clintons want to reset the board in their favor and then move the pieces.”

Trump hasn’t said he intends to run again in 2024, but he routinely bests other potential Republican candidates in polls.

In a recent Reuters/Ipsos survey, 54 percent of Republicans picked Trump as their top choice, far above the 11 percent who chose Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis.

%d bloggers like this: